Services

FAQs

1. When and where are the alcohol-free zones in place?

2. What is a public place?

3. Why have we introduced alcohol-free zones?

4. What activities are prohibited in alcohol-free zones?

5. Who enforces alcohol-free zone rules?

6. What do Police have the power to do in alcohol-free zones?

7. What should I do if I have bought alcohol and am walking through a public place?

8. If I'm at a private party, can I drink alcohol on the footpath outside that property?

9. Can I drink alcohol at promoted events in public places?

10. Can I consume alcohol in a vehicle in an alcohol-free zone?

11. I am freedom camping overnight in a designated public place. Can I drink in my campervan past 9pm?

12. How do I make a complaint if I see people drinking in public during restricted hours and am concerned about their behaviour?

13. I have seen a sign which has been damaged, stolen or defaced. What should I do?

14. How can I request an alcohol-free zone sign be put up near my property?

15. Can I have a copy of the poster or sticker advertising alcohol-free zones to put up in my shop or shop window?

 

1. When and where are the alcohol-free zones in place?
The bylaw provides for:

  • overnight alcohol-free zones from 9pm to 6am at all beaches in the district
  • overnight alcohol-free zones from 9pm to 6am at public places in urban areas (from Paekākāriki to Te Horo)
  • 24 hour, 7 day per week alcohol-free zones for all skate parks in the district
  • 24 hour, 7 day per week alcohol-free zones in specified areas of Otaki.

For further information and maps, please see the current bylaw:

‘Control of Alcohol in Public Places Bylaw 2013’

2. What is a public place?
A public place includes a road, footpath, reserve, park, beach or sports ground that is under Council control.

3. Why have we introduced alcohol-free zones?
This is one part of a community-wide strategy to reduce alcohol-related crime and harm.

A district-wide ban gives Police the ability to intervene when alcohol is being misused in public places. This will reduce the risk of unruly groups getting out of control in public places due to alcohol and harming themselves or other people/property.

4. What activities are prohibited in alcohol-free zones?
It is an offence to consume or possess liquor in the alcohol-free zones, unless:

  • you are consuming the liquor at a premises that is licensed under the Sale and Supply of Alcohol Act 2012 (i.e. clearly defined licensed area including tables and chairs on the footpath)
  • you have purchased the unopened liquor from a liquor licensed premises and are transporting the liquor promptly through the public place to a private property
  • you have been granted a waiver or dispensation in writing from a Council Officer.

5. Who enforces alcohol-free zone rules?

Only Police can enforce the rules. However, the public can help by reporting people who are drinking and causing problems in a public place during restricted hours to Police (call 111).

6. What do Police have the power to do in alcohol-free zones?
Police intend to use their discretion, but can:

  • give you a warning
  • seize any alcohol (opened or unopened)
  • search any container (including a bag, box, parcel or vehicle)
  • use the power of arrest.

7. What should I do if I have bought alcohol and am walking through a public place?

Make sure your alcohol is stored in a bag while you walk through the public place and that it remains unopened.

8. If I'm at a private party, can I drink alcohol on the footpath outside that property?
No because footpaths are defined as public places.

9. Can I drink alcohol at promoted events in public places?
If an event in a public place has a special licence, then you can drink alcohol at that event. If it is an unlicensed event, the area occupied by the event has the same rules applying to it as any other public place in the alcohol-free zone during the hours the restriction is in force (i.e. you are not allowed to consume alcohol there).

10. Can I consume alcohol in a vehicle in an alcohol-free zone?
No, you cannot consume liquor in a vehicle when it is parked in a public place during the hours the restriction is in force.

11. I am freedom camping overnight in a designated public place. Can I drink in my campervan past 9pm?
Strictly speaking this is not allowed. However, Police can use discretion in relation to enforcement of rules in alcohol-free zones. Provided you are drinking in your private, fully-compliant, self-contained campervan and you are not causing any disturbance to others, it is unlikely the Police will be concerned.

12. How do I make a complaint if I see people drinking in public during restricted hours and am concerned about their behaviour?
Call 111 if you see people drinking in a public place during the restricted hours and they are being disorderly and/or harming themselves or other people/property.

13. I have seen a sign which has been damaged, stolen or defaced. What should I do?
Ring Council's Service Centre on 0800 486 486 and tell the operator where the sign is located. The appropriate staff member will then be contacted and the sign will be fixed or a new one installed.

14. How can I request an alcohol-free zone sign be put up near my property?
If you have seen people causing problems by drinking in a public place near your property, you can request a sign is put up there.

Ring Council's Service Centre on 0800 486 486 to talk to an operator about your request. The appropriate staff member will then be contacted and he/she will discuss the issue with Police to see if they agree a sign should be installed where you've requested

If a sign is installed, you will not be charged.

15. Can I have a copy of the poster or sticker advertising alcohol-free zones to put up in my shop or shop window?
It's great to have businesses supporting alcohol-free zones. Ring Council's Service Centre on 0800 486 486 to request a poster or sticker (for the latter, make sure you state whether you want one that is sticky at the front or on the back).